As it now seems that summer is upon us, and most people will have stopped using their wood stoves and open fires, don’t forget to keep a check on your Carbon Monoxide alarm.

The test button should still be regularly pressed to ensure the alarm is in working order, and an often neglected task is to clean the alarm. This can be done by removing the alarm from the wall, (lift the alarm up and then pull towards you and it should then be removed from the wall), and then vacuuming it, paying particular attention to the vent area.

Most alarms are sealed units, so it is not possible to open up and clean, so it is important that regular vacuuming keeps on top of any dust from clogging up the sensors.

Also remember that when the battery life has been reached, the alarm will beep at regular intervals to indicate that it will require replacement. With the sealed units this is a complete replacement alarm, and not a replacement battery. You can then dispose of the expired alarm in a safe and responsible manner.

Always ensure that each wood and solid fuel appliance has an alarm situated in close proximity to it, (exact locations as per the manufacturers’ installation instructions), and that you are not at risk by just having one alarm located in the hall, for all appliances. (This would also contravene the current building regulations).

David Ebbs, Technical Sales Support

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